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Flexing Fluency Muscles with Great Texts (Oh…and they are free too!)

In this short blog, Penny Slater points to some texts that may prove useful in the last few weeks leading up to this year’s SATS.

Let’s cut to the chase…It’s early summer term. You are a Y6 teacher. You have a couple of weeks left before the 2017 Reading SATs paper. What you are probably looking for are some great texts that will give your pupils a final push to prepare for the challenge ahead? Oh…and you probably need those texts to be free and easily accessible. If so, read on….

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Guided reading – whole class or guided groups?

In this blog, Alison Dawkins takes a look at the ways in which guided reading is organised and shares some reflections on the benefits of guiding reading in groups.  To explore some earlier ideas from Alison in relation to streamlining the more traditional reading carousel,  you may want to read Guided Reading – Where next? 

Both in and out of school at the moment, I’m meeting increasing numbers of people talking about trying ‘whole class guided reading’ in KS2. They mention the children’s enthusiasm, the opportunity to engage with a whole text, the deepened questioning, and the release from the burden of planning a range of ‘activities’.

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The power of a good book – leading the way to successful grammar teaching.

In this blog, Kathy Roe looks at the invaluable role that high quality texts can play in supporting children’s knowledge and understanding of grammar. 

Continue reading “The power of a good book – leading the way to successful grammar teaching.”

Modelling early literacy

Kirsten Snook is a Teaching and Learning Adviser for English at Herts for Learning

We tend to think that children are intrinsically motivated to write much later than they are to read. But why? It has, however, been suggested that very young children are more motivated by a shared writing episode than a shared reading one, due to an emerging sense of self and place in the world.

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As Easy as A B FluenCy!

Penny Slater, Deputy Lead Adviser for Primary English shares some class-based exploration of reading fluency.

There is definitely a buzz in the air about fluency at the moment! And quite rightly so…

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Reading on the Rise -Raising Standards conference 27th March

We are extremely pleased to be able to provide schools with an opportunity to hear from Sarah Hubbard  – Ofsted’s National Lead for English – who will be leading a session on ‘Reading, assessment and curriculum development’. Places are limited so early booking is advised.

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HfL Primary English newsletter Spring 2017

Here we are again.   A new term.  A new year.  We hope that you have had a lovely Christmas break and that the new term has begun as smoothly as possible for you all.   With this in mind, we thought we’d share our latest-hfl-primary-english-newsletter-spring-2017as swiftly as possible, especially as it is such a short half term.

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Take One Book: Ready for action with Traction Man

Penny Slater is Deputy Lead Adviser on the Primary English team at Herts for Learning.

If you haven’t yet found your passion for children’s literature, then Traction Man is the text that will set you on the road to discovering what all the fuss is about. Put simply, Traction Man is one of those books that prove just how exciting children’s literature can be.

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A book (is) for life (not just for Christmas): Back to Marianne Dreams

Following on from our recent blog on books that trigger emotional responses, Alison Dawkins offers some reflections on one such book that has left a lingering trace.

A few weeks ago, my chum Martin  wrote about the importance of reading scary and sad books , as adults and as children, and as usual, got me thinking. Specifically, thinking again about Marianne Dreams by Catherine Storr .

He’s quite right, when he mentioned the book back in the summer, I visibly shuddered with a ‘oh, that book’s so scary’, (although I have to say there was already a set of six copies in the guided reading choices for Y6 in my old school, ready and waiting to scare them each year) and agreed to re-read. Oddly, I found that I’d misremembered the ending, and then in fact, realised I’d misremembered it before. A deliberate trick of my subconscious because I still find it quite unsettling for all its apparently happy tying up of ends? I wonder.

Continue reading “A book (is) for life (not just for Christmas): Back to Marianne Dreams”

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