Search

Herts for Learning

Blogs for Learning

Category

Composition

Modelling early literacy

Kirsten Snook is a Teaching and Learning Adviser for English at Herts for Learning

We tend to think that children are intrinsically motivated to write much later than they are to read. But why? It has, however, been suggested that very young children are more motivated by a shared writing episode than a shared reading one, due to an emerging sense of self and place in the world.

Continue reading “Modelling early literacy”

Year 6 Writing – in search of GDS pt 1: Shifts in formality

Martin Galway is a Teaching and Learning Adviser for English at Herts for Learning

On Friday of last week, the STA released a video that sought to address “particular areas of concern” around the assessment and moderation of year 6 writing.  The video covers a number of areas and opens with some commentary around the statements relating to Working at Greater Depth within the expected standard (GDS).

Continue reading “Year 6 Writing – in search of GDS pt 1: Shifts in formality”

The Key to Successful Shared Writing: Perfectly Pitched Models

Penny Slater is Deputy Lead Adviser for primary English at Herts for Learning.

Shared writing scaffolds the writing task, and when done well, leads a child towards becoming a more reflective, confident and skilled writer. When done very well, we engender more engaged writers who feel empowered and inspired to put pen to paper.

Continue reading “The Key to Successful Shared Writing: Perfectly Pitched Models”

Writing at Greater Depth (1) : A model of formality

Penny Slater is Deputy Lead Adviser for Primary English at Herts for Learning

There are many moments in my working day when I stop and consider how lucky I am to be working amongst such committed, enthusiastic and inspirational people. When I was classroom-based, this inspirational often stemmed from the children whom I taught. Now, as an advisor, I find that I am inspired on a daily basis by the creativity of the teachers whom I have the joy of supporting.

Continue reading “Writing at Greater Depth (1) : A model of formality”

HfL Primary English newsletter Spring 2017

Here we are again.   A new term.  A new year.  We hope that you have had a lovely Christmas break and that the new term has begun as smoothly as possible for you all.   With this in mind, we thought we’d share our latest-hfl-primary-english-newsletter-spring-2017as swiftly as possible, especially as it is such a short half term.

Continue reading “HfL Primary English newsletter Spring 2017”

Take One Book: Ready for action with Traction Man

Penny Slater is Deputy Lead Adviser on the Primary English team at Herts for Learning.

If you haven’t yet found your passion for children’s literature, then Traction Man is the text that will set you on the road to discovering what all the fuss is about. Put simply, Traction Man is one of those books that prove just how exciting children’s literature can be.

Continue reading “Take One Book: Ready for action with Traction Man”

Wading through the treacle: unpicking KS1 writing guidance.

Sabrina Wright is a Teaching and Learning Adviser for English at Herts for Learning

After reading my colleague’s recent blog (Writing at ARE might be Simpler than you thought!), I found myself tempted to unpick the KS1 ARE exemplification materials in the same way.

Continue reading “Wading through the treacle: unpicking KS1 writing guidance.”

The Beauty of Simplicity

Penny Slater follows up her earlier blog on the value of simple sentences in Year 6 writing.

Following on from my last blog, where I unpicked the clause structures used by Morgan in his Working at ARE writing portfolio, I felt the urge to spend a little more time lingering on the beauty of the simple (or single-clause – depending on your definition preference) sentence, and how we can secure it in our children’s writing.

Continue reading “The Beauty of Simplicity”

Writing at ARE might be Simpler than you thought!

Penny Slater takes a look at exemplified writing and finds that simple writing is not to be sniffed at.

Whilst working in a school recently and engaging in yet another bout of ITAF tussling, it came to my attention that both the Subject Leader and I were unsure about the exact meaning of the 5th bullet point in the Working At Standard for writing:

  • Using a wide range of clause structures, sometimes varying their position within the sentence

I was surprised that something so seemingly straightforward had us so unsure about its exact meaning. What clause structures are being referred to? What constitutes a wide range?

Continue reading “Writing at ARE might be Simpler than you thought!”

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑