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Differentiation – How different does it have to look?

Nicola Adams is an adviser for Primary Mathematics at Herts for Learning.  In this, her first blog, she considers how differentiation or meeting the needs of all learners in the classroom is crucial but not always evident to those observing a lesson. She builds on Rachel Rayner’s blog FOMA – Fear of Maths Accountability to demonstrate how three boxes for differentiation is missing the point, and that observers must engage with the teacher before making judgements.

Picture this. Somebody is coming in to observe your maths lesson and what they see is all of the children doing the same thing. They all have access to the same manipulatives; they can all see the same working wall; they are sat in mixed-ability partners, they are playing a mathematical game… and there is conversation happening. The horror! Are they going to say that you are not challenging your more able? Are they going to ask why your lower ability children are not being supported by an adult? Are they going to say that your more able children simply don’t need the same manipulatives as the others? Just where is the differentiation? Continue reading “Differentiation – How different does it have to look?”

KS2 SATs 2017 – Lessons Learned (The Sequel)

Louise Racher is a Mathematics Teaching and Learning Adviser at HfL, in this she gives her own interpretation of what priorities teachers might have had leading up to KS2 SATs, and what the priorities might be for next year following the second year of “New Curriculum” SATs.

Year 6 teachers had their game face on for the second year of the newly revised end of KS2 SATs.  Greater awareness of how the papers would be presented meant it was a slightly fairer fight and lessons learned from the previous year were taken on board and assimilated back into classrooms across the land.  Continue reading “KS2 SATs 2017 – Lessons Learned (The Sequel)”

Year 5: Making the Last Term Count

Calling all Year 5 teachers! Louise Racher sets out what your pupils need to secure this term in readiness for their final year at primary.  

Yes, the summer term is fast approaching. Year 5 are pulling up their socks, straightening their ties and getting ready to oust the current Year 6 pupils from their top spot.  Year 6, this final year of primary school, or the end of Key Stage for those in middle schools.  Along with Year 6 comes the end of Key Stage assessments which the school will be accountable for, whether they are good, bad or ugly.  Continue reading “Year 5: Making the Last Term Count”

Tried and tested: Diminishing the difference at UKS2

Nicola Randall is a Primary Mathematics Adviser for Herts for Learning where she has been working on closing the gaps projects with disadvantaged learners, working with schools to champion their needs.  She has worked on behalf of the Virtual School.

Over the past few years, I have been working with schools across Hertfordshire to accelerate the mathematical progress of pupils in receipt of the pupil premium funding. The DfE research paper (November 2015) suggests that the 3 strategies which have the greatest impact on the attainment of disadvantaged pupils are: paired or small group additional teaching, improving feedback and one-to-one tuition. Whilst these are clearly helpful for closing gaps in understanding or knowledge, sometimes it’s the small tweaks to whole class practise that can make the biggest difference. Having worked alongside teachers, I have looked in great depth at many pupils’ work and together with teachers we have reflected on how the pupils conduct themselves during maths lessons.  What is clear, is that each individual pupil comes with their own experiences, strengths and areas of difficulty yet interestingly, through this approach, I found there were some common barriers holding this vulnerable group back in mathematics. Continue reading “Tried and tested: Diminishing the difference at UKS2”

Are the boys really better at mathematics?

Kate Kellner is a  Primary Maths Adviser at Herts for Learning

Is it possible that we still have a gap in attainment between higher achieving boys and girls in primary mathematics? And, what should we do about it?

I am not the first to write on this topic. Many have gone before me, to lament the achievement of girls in mathematics. Studies over time, and across the world, have tried to fathom why there might be an achievement gap based on gender. Interestingly, the gap is not present across the whole world. It appears to be more prevalent in Anglo-Saxon areas including the UK and the USA. Continue reading “Are the boys really better at mathematics?”

So you have textbooks…so what?

Siobhan King is a Mathematics Adviser at Herts for Learning

I have been thinking about maths text books: what they add to lessons and how they can be used effectively.  I am a firm believer in not reinventing the wheel and know that teacher time is finite and exceptionally valuable.   Furthermore, I agree with Tim Oates’ assertion that “high quality textbooks support both teachers and pupils – they free teachers up to concentrate on refining pedagogy and developing engaging, effective learning.”  (Oates, 2014, p4) Continue reading “So you have textbooks…so what?”

Subject Leaders and SATs – Where now?

David Cook is the Lead Teaching and Learning Adviser for Primary Mathematics at Herts for Learning

Recently he collated everything he and the team had found after analysing the scripts of both KS1 and KS2 tests and fed this back to Hertfordshire subject leaders and then gathered their experiences together.  This blog reflects that presentation and subsequent work with subject leaders. Continue reading “Subject Leaders and SATs – Where now?”

‘It’s differentiation Jim, but not as we know it!’

Nicola Randall is a Primary Mathematics Adviser at Herts for Learning

Over the past year I have worked with several schools developing a mastery approach to teaching and learning in Mathematics. The approach fits well with the new curriculum and enables both teachers and pupils’ depth of learning. From my conversations with teachers and leaders, one question that is on everyone’s mind is ‘what about differentiation?’ Continue reading “‘It’s differentiation Jim, but not as we know it!’”

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